The Trump Administration Is Making Asylum Seekers Camp Out at Bridges. Now Advocates Say Mexico Is Removing Some of Them.

“You get to do all the dirty work and the US doesn’t get blamed, right?,” one lawyer asked Mexican officials.

Luis Miguel Montimo, 32, waits on the Gateway Bridge in Matamaros, Mexico in July with his girlfriend and one-year-old-son. He said his ex-wife started dating a gang member and the gang torched his home killing his 2 children inside.Carol Guzy/ZUMA

Removing people from the bridges over the Rio Grande would represent a significant escalation in efforts to prevent asylum-seekers without Mexican transit visas from legally entering the United States at official ports of entry.

The group of migrants was sleeping on the B&M Bridge because US officials are now forcing asylum-seekers to wait—often for days—before they are allowed to set in foot in the United States and request protection from persecution. The removals come despite the fact that the Trump administration has repeatedly told asylum-seekers to come to ports of entry instead of crossing the border without authorization.

Jennifer Harbury, a Texas human rights lawyer, says US Customs and Border Protection and Mexican officials are working together to remove people on the bridges who don’t have permission to be in Mexico. Mexican officials are also trying to stop migrants who lack visas from getting onto the bridge between McAllen, Texas, and Reynosa, Mexico, in the first place. If they do get onto the bridge, Harbury says, CBP sometimes alerts Mexican officials and tells them to come and remove them. She says that a number of Mexican officials have told her that CBP calls their bosses, who instruct them to go detain the unauthorized people on the bridge. US officials are “checking for Mexican papers, which is not their job,” Harbury says.

CBP disputes that it is working with Mexican officials to remove people from bridges. “Mexico has its own laws and CBP would not ask them to do anything on our behalf,” a CBP spokesperson told Mother Jones in an email. The spokesperson also wrote, “Mexican immigration authorities screen third country nationals in accordance with their sovereign laws and policies. If a traveler is determined not to have legal status in Mexico, Mexican immigration authorities would will [sic] take the appropriate action.”

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Canada to join Mexico, Japan, South Korea and the EU in auto tariff talks

Japan and the European Union organized a meeting for Tuesday in Geneva, where vice and deputy ministers from Canada, the EU, Japan and South Korea will gather to talk about the punishing levies threatened by U.S. President Donald Trump. (Frank Augstein/Associated Press)

Canada will join Mexico and European and Asian auto-producing countries this week to plot strategy ahead of the potential imposition of tariffs on vehicles and auto parts exported to the United States.

Japan and the European Union organized the meeting for Tuesday in Geneva, where vice and deputy ministers from Canada, the EU, Japan and South Korea will gather to talk about the punishing levies threatened by U.S. President Donald Trump.

A Canadian government official told The Canadian Press on Sunday that deputy international trade minister Timothy Sargent would attend the meeting on Canada’s behalf.

Trump has threatened to impose tariffs under Section 232 of the decades-old U.S. Trade Expansion Act. The legislation allows the president, under certain circumstances, to impose duties recommended by his commerce secretary under the notion that the goods being imported are a threat to national security.

Just as it did after the U.S. imposed hefty tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada and other nations, the Trudeau government has said it would respond to auto tariffs with its own countermeasures.

The Canadian Automobile Dealers Association has warned that “dollar-for-dollar” retaliatory levies would have a much more significant effect on Canada’s auto sector than counter-tariffs on aluminum and steel.

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U.S. Army Veteran Deported to Mexico After 2 Tours in Afghanistan

U.S. Army veteran Miguel Perez Jr. was deported to Mexico Friday, despite having served two tours in Afghanistan that reportedly left him with post-traumatic stress disorder, CNN reports.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) escorted Perez, 39, across the US-Mexico border and handed him over to Mexican authorities after a felony drug charge prevented him from obtaining U.S. citizenship.

In 2010, Perez was convicted on a cocaine charge, had his green card revoked and was sentenced to 15 years in prison. After serving half his sentence, he was transferred to an immigration detention center.

Perez had lived in the U.S. legally with permanent residence status since he was 11, according to a statement released by the office of Ill. Senator Tammy Duckworth. Perez’s parents and children are citizens, it said.

Perez’ family and supporters had lobbied for the veteran to be able to stay in the country in return for his years of service, and asked that he receive treatment for substance abuse that he has attributed to his experiences in Afghanistan.

After his service, Perez was diagnosed at a military hospital with PTSD, as well as a possible brain injury.

ICE spokesperson Nicole Alberico told NBC that the agency has the right to exercise “prosecutorial discretion” including with members of the U.S. armed forces who do not automatically obtain citizenship.

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