Trump threatens to close southern border if Congress doesn’t fund wall

WASHINGTON (AP) — The partial government shutdown will almost certainly be handed off to a divided government to solve in the new year, as both parties traded blame Friday and President Donald Trump sought to raise the stakes in the weeklong impasse.  As agreement eludes Washington in the waning days of the Republican monopoly on power, it sets up the first big confrontation between Trump and newly empowered Democrats. Trump is sticking with his demand for money to build a border wall with Mexico, and Democrats, who take control of the House on Jan. 3, are refusing to give him what he wants.

Trump raised the stakes on Friday, reissuing threats to shut the U.S.-Mexico border to pressure Congress to fund the wall and to cease aid to three Central American countries from which many migrants have fled.

The president also signaled he was in no rush to seek a resolution, welcoming the fight as he heads toward his own bid for re-election in 2020. He tweeted Thursday evening that Democrats may be able to block him now, ‘‘but we have the issue, Border Security. 2020!’’

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Under the Fog of Kavanaugh, House Passes $3.8 Trillion More in Tax Cuts

Mitch McConnell: Senate Will ‘Plow Right Through’ Kavanaugh Confirmation
Kavanaugh is accused of sexual misconduct.
By Glenn FleishmanSeptember 28, 2018
With attention fixed on the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a new $3.1 trillion tax cut on Friday. The vote was 220 to 191, including three Democrats.  The down-to-the-wire 2017 tax act passed in late December contained a mix of permanent and temporary changes that had to result in a net increased cost that fell within a structural limit of $1.5 trillion that allowed the Senate to approve the bill with a simple majority.

The House’s new bill takes effect starting in 2025, and would add $600 billion to the national debt within the next decade, and then $3.2 trillion in the 10 years after that, according to Howard Gleckman of the Tax Policy Center.

Despite the House vote, it is unlikely the Senate will take up the legislation. The first round of tax cuts landed with a thud, with even a leaked Republican National Committee poll—reported on by Bloomberg News—showing American voters thought it benefited “large corporations and rich Americans” by an overall 2-to-1 margin and the same margin among independent voters.

Without special rules in place, the Senate would vote under normal procedures, which can require 60 senators’ votes to pass a bill that is heavily opposed.

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US House Votes To Outlaw Eating Cats And Dogs

September 12, 2018 News, Politics

Was this really a big problem anywhere? CBS News reports:

The government shuts down at the end of the month, and Democrats and Republicans seem unable to make a deal to keep it open. They are, however, united in trying to stop people from eating pets.

The House passed a bill Wednesday by voice vote banning the slaughter, transportation, sale and possession of dogs and cats for consumption. The “Dog and Cat Meat Trade Prohibition Act of 2018” was sponsored by Republican Rep. Vern Buchanan [photo] and Democratic Rep. Alcee Hastings, both of Florida.

Buchanan wrote in his statement about the bill that 44 states do not have laws banning consumption of cats and dogs, adding that this practice “should be outlawed completely given how beloved these animals are for most Americans.”
The six states that already have such a law are California, Georgia, Hawaii, Michigan, New York, and Virginia.

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